Tag Archives: Leadership assessment

Australia’s Political Leaders, where are they?

The latest Newspoll (conducted for The Australian newspaper) clearly shows that Tony Abbott and his alternative, Bill Shorten, have both lost popularity with the Australian public. The recently released Reader’s Digest Australia annual Trusted People survey of 2014 listed door-to-door salespeople, politicians, insurance salespeople, sex workers and call centre staff as the least trusted professions in that order. At least Tony and Bill can take some comfort from the fact their unpopularity isn’t just about them, its about their profession as well.

When evaluating CEO’s and their senior management team I review ability from four perspectives, strategic, collaborative, inspirational and achievement.

When considering Tony and Bill’s strategic ability is it in the context of what is best for Australia or how they stay in/get in power? All we seem to hear from an opposition party (the current opposition and their predecessors) is negative, for example both have played the broken promises line very consistently. This constant sniping is at best tactical and is certainly not strategic. What is our big picture vision, what are we trying to be? Can either Bill or Tony answer this?

Collaborative ability is hard to assess without seeing how Tony and Bill work with others, internally and eternally to their own party’s.

Inspirational ability. A leader will not inspire you unless you trust them, why would anyone want to follow someone they don’t trust. The results of the Reader’s Digest Australia annual Trusted People survey would suggest both leaders and their colleagues are short of the mark in this aspect of leadership.

Achievement ability. This is strategy implementation. This is not about agreeing with the action, for example raising the retirement age to 70 is an action regardless if it is a good strategy or not. It would be an interesting case study to list the major actions either party has taken in the last three years. Further more it would be worthwhile noting which of these actions have impacted marginal seats.

Australia is crying out for political leaders who have a big picture view for Australia and not just their own power; leaders who work well with our neighbors while ensuring alignment with our own needs, leaders who have the strength of character to stand by their beliefs and deserve our respect if not always our agreement and leaders who strive for action that is driven by a overarching direction and not the ballot box.

Simon Tedstone

Director, Leading Change Consulting

http://www.linkedin.com/in/simontedstone

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Poor leadership will cost Australian organisations dearly

“Only one in four employees in Australian workplaces believe their managers do a good job,” These findings are the result of a new survey into management by the Centre for Workplace Leadership, a federally funded research centre at Melbourne University and reported in today’s Age newspaper.

Three quarters of staff think they are poorly led.  This has huge ramifications for organisational performance.  Change management, evolution, innovation and restructuring are all things that need to happen to ensure survival let alone success and they all depend on good leadership.  If people do not believe in their leaders these activities are going to be less successful at best and utter failures at worst.

Why has Australian corporate leadership fallen to such a low point?

The wrong people are being promoted and recruited.  Many organisations don’t know or understand what skills and abilities they require in their middle to senior roles.  Furthermore even if they do have some concept of what they need they are not good at assessing potential leaders for it.  Too many organisations are simply putting high potential selection and promotion down to an online survey and good internal relationships.

When new leaders start their roles they are not always set up for success.  They are not supported or guided and helped to understand how their new role requires different abilities to their previous one.  With this lack of “on boarding” new leaders will be inclined to simply keep doing what made then successful in their previous role, after all it helped to get them promoted.  This means new senior leaders (and very often not so new ones as well) keep working at a micro level within the organisation rather than moving to a more macro focus.  This again can be a major impediment to organisational evolution and innovation, i.e. the organisation gets left behind.

Due to a variety of reasons Australia has escaped the worst of recent global financial trends.  However, Australia is no longer in the fortunate economic position it was several years ago.  This is at a time when many of Australia’s global competitors are finally moving forward economically after years of stagnation.  This is a time when Australian businesses need to be well lead, from the top and within.  This is not a time to take a tick in a box approach to high potential identification and promotion, this is a time to do it properly to get the best leaders, deliver the best organisational performance and ultimately the best shareholder return.

by Simon Tedstone

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Filed under Uncategorized

Poor leadership will cost Australian organisations dearly

“Only one in four employees in Australian workplaces believe their managers do a good job,” These findings are the result of a new survey into management by the Centre for Workplace Leadership, a federally funded research centre at Melbourne University and reported in today’s Age newspaper.

Three quarters of staff think they are poorly led.  This has huge ramifications for organisational performance.  Change management, evolution, innovation and restructuring are all things that need to happen to ensure survival let alone success and they all depend on good leadership.  If people do not believe in their leaders these activities are going to be less successful at best and utter failures at worst.

Why has Australian corporate leadership fallen to such a low point?

The wrong people are being promoted and recruited.  Many organisations don’t know or understand what skills and abilities they require in their middle to senior roles.  Furthermore even if they do have some concept of what they need they are not good at assessing potential leaders for it.  Too many organisations are simply putting high potential selection and promotion down to an online survey and good internal relationships.

When new leaders start their roles they are not always set up for success.  They are not supported or guided and helped to understand how their new role requires different abilities to their previous one.  With this lack of “on boarding” new leaders will be inclined to simply keep doing what made then successful in their previous role, after all it helped to get them promoted.  This means new senior leaders (and very often not so new ones as well) keep working at a micro level within the organisation rather than moving to a more macro focus.  This again can be a major impediment to organisational evolution and innovation, i.e. the organisation gets left behind.

Due to a variety of reasons Australia has escaped the worst of recent global financial trends.  However, Australia is no longer in the fortunate economic position it was several years ago.  This is at a time when many of Australia’s global competitors are finally moving forward economically after years of stagnation.  This is a time when Australian businesses need to be well lead, from the top and within.  This is not a time to take a tick in a box approach to high potential identification and promotion, this is a time to do it properly to get the best leaders, deliver the best organisational performance and ultimately the best shareholder return.

by Simon Tedstone

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